Categories: Guide Feature

Russ Kegler

800 • 669 • 3474

Russ Kegler

Published: March 15, 2021

Growing up in Southern California, I developed a passion for the ocean and water. Of course, this led to hitting the waves and learning to surf. Surfing is very spiritual to me. Those that have surfed onto the open shoulder will understand. It was a life changing event for me. Even as a guide today I dream of the open water and the big waves, watching videos on social media to get my fix. This also led to free dives at the Channel Islands. Catalina was my favorite spot to dive.

My other passions growing up were fishing and racing dirt bikes. I rode dirt bikes for many years before a couple of injuries made that career decision for me. Just like surfing, this is something that I miss in my daily life. Dirt bikes are definitely a young man’s game, especially in the competitive arena that I was pursuing.

Russ racing

After my injuries I headed north to Redding.  At the time I was working for Circuit City and was able to transfer to their Redding location. I was proud to be one of their top salespeople and enjoyed my job. Unfortunately, Circuit City closed and I was about to be left jobless. However, my love of fly fishing and the outdoors had sent me to The Fly Shop® for local fishing direction and necessary gear. I got to know the team at the shop and when my job was ending I was able to land a retail position at The Fly Shop®, where I worked for 8 years. In 2017 I decided that it was time for me to leave the indoors and be on the water every day bringing me back to my love of the closest thing to the ocean, the rivers and streams of Northern California.

Russ' tying tableI have busy hands and I like to create/engineer and design things, creativity is a passion of mine. This of course led to me tying my own fly patterns such as the RK 20/20, Sin City, BH Big Bird, and Frosty Flatulator Chironomid. These are just a few of the patterns that I’ve come up with. However, in my free time you’ll find me at the vise spinning bugs of all types. Steelhead patterns, intruders, and bass poppers are a favorite due to the endless creativity that one can have with paints, hair colors, etc…

Q&A with Russ Kegler:

How did you get started in fly fishing?
My parents — thankful for my mom.  She led the way to me getting my first Cortland fiberglass rod and what has become a complete fly tying extravaganza. I was only eight at the time. I have vivid memories!

How did you get started as a fishing guide?
While working as a retail salesperson at The Fly Shop® I got the opportunity to guide during some busy seasons. I was hooked! I took that opportunity, worked hard and was given a chance. That hard work and work ethic helped me to become the guide and person I am today.

If you had one piece of advice to give to your guide clients, what would it be?
The one who has the most fun wins!

Favorite fish to pursue?
All of them – the harder to catch the better. Taking on a running rooster from the beach is definitely a high!

What fly fishing destination is on your bucket list?
Baja – roosters and surfing!

Russ with a steelheadFavorite fly rod and why?
Winston B3x 5wt – the best all purpose rod, and it’s a dream casting size 18 dries on 6x with precision. It is also great for throwing topwater poppers on 12lb Maxima.  Winston rods are truly amazing in so many ways!

Favorite reel and why?
Ross Colorado – Why not make it a bit harder and give the fish more of a fighting chance? Much of the time with trout there is no need for a drag.

Favorite fly and why?
RK’s Flatulators – a pattern that I created during my time at The Fly Shop®. They catch fish! My favorite part of being the creator is when people come into the shop and ask for them but they are sold out, then I say give RK’s Sin City a try.

What is your greatest fly fishing extravagance?
Coastal steelhead

I Know Bill SchaadtWhich living or non-living fly fisher would you want to spend a day fly fishing with?
Bill Schaadt, though there’s many I would like to have spent time with … it must have been truly amazing to have fished those coastal rivers during the 1950s. But if l knew then what I know now, it would have been painful to watch the slaughter that took place on those rivers. Nevertheless, I am sure it was colorful in many ways.

Who are your favorite writers?
John Severson

What single issue in fly fishing do you feel has the greatest adverse potential?
The evening hatch! Dries. Never seem to make it home on time for great homecooked meals.

What is the most memorable fly fishing trip you’ve taken?
The Ruby River in Montana

Which talent or natural gift would you most like to have?
Music

Who are your heroes in real life?
I have many!  Someone who can put his boots on faster than me – let’s go!

What is your fly fishing pet peeve?
Laziness

Bald Eagle at Baranof Wilderness LodgeWhat do you most value in your friends?
Respect, appreciation, discipline, and forgiveness

If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be?
Raptor

Book Russ for a day of guided fishing to learn more

To book Russ or one of our other excellent guides, please give us a call at 800-669-3474 during business hours any day of the week, or email us at bryan@theflyshop.com or chris@theflyshop.com anytime. We can give you the answers you need, detailed explanations to questions you might have, or check on availability and confirm your reservation in minutes.

Brooks Provence

800 • 669 • 3474

Brooks Provence

Published: March 10, 2021

We would like to welcome Brooks Provence to the guide team here at The Fly Shop®

Brooks ProvenceBorn and raised in beautiful Redding, CA, Brooks began fishing Hat Creek and Eagle Lake with his grandfather. Brooks discovered fly fishing in high school with a group of his close friends, and decided this was something he would pursue for life. He has been guiding for the past seven years here in Northern California on Hat Creek, Fall River, Pit River, and the Upper and Lower Sacramento Rivers. In the spring and summer he chases trout, but looks forward to late summer and fall when he can swing and skate flies for steelhead on the Trinity River and later on in winter on the coast. Brooks is a joy to spend the day with and is super knowledgeable for both the beginner and advanced angler. An avid snow hound during big winter storms, when the rivers are blown out, you will find him on the slopes bouncing through the trees in search of that epic ride.

Q&A with Brooks Provence:

How did you get started in fly fishing?
Group of buddies in high school

How did you get started as a fishing guide?
Went to a guide school in 2013

If you had one piece of advice to give to your guide clients, what would it be?
Come with a positive attitude and the fun will follow.

Favorite fish to pursue?
Brown trout and steelhead

What fly fishing destination is on your bucket list?
Kola Peninsula

Favorite fly rod?
Sage X — super light and sends rockets

Favorite reel?
Hardy St. John — nothing like letting everyone know you’re into a good one with the reel screaming

Favorite fly?
I like them all!

What is your greatest fly fishing extravagance?
Can never have too many rods or reels

Which living or non-living fly fisher would you want to spend a day fly fishing with?
Joe Humphrey

What single issue in fly fishing do you feel has the greatest adverse potential?
Number of anglers and some of the regulations for certain rivers

What is the most memorable fly fishing trip you’ve taken?
Haven’t gone very far but nothing like steelhead trips with all the boys

What is your fly fishing pet peeve?
When the fish won’t stop eating my flies

What do you most value in your friends?
The willingness to adventure to unfamiliar places

If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be?
Definitely a bald eagle

Booking Brooks for a day of guided fishing

To book Brooks or one of our other excellent guides, please give us a call at 800-669-3474 during business hours any day of the week, or email us at bryan@theflyshop.com or chris@theflyshop.com anytime. We can give you the answers you need, detailed explanations to questions you might have, or check on availability and confirm your reservation in minutes.

A Day With Ernie

800 • 669 • 3474

A Day With Ernie

Published: February 17, 2021

A Day on the Trinity with Ernie Denison
By Erik Argotti

I first heard about Ernie Denison about 15 years ago when my good buddy Gabe Duran, who I guided with in Alaska, was moving back to his hometown in Northern California to start guiding the area.

Like most guides who work in Alaska or in many of the Rocky Mountain states, it is hard to pull off a full time guiding career without heading down to Florida, Louisiana or the Caribbean to fill in needed days on the water to make ends meet. Many of these guides hop back and forth between hemispheres, heading to South America for the winters to fill their calendars.

Young Ernie Denison on the Lower Sacramento RiverGabe told me about this guy named Ernie who guided 300 days a year and most of his fishing was within an hour of his house. Having guided for a good number of years, it wasn’t the work that was so interesting, it was the idea of guiding that many days a year. I would do some intense stints of 140+ days in a row, but I was done for a while, usually for the year and took some much needed time off. This guy was doubling that in a year and fishing on his days off.

Ernie with a steelheadFast forward to 2021 and a friend of mine and great customer, Tom, invited me to fish with him on one of his two days on the Trinity River for steelhead with the legend, Ernie. I was more than happy to take a break from the office and see the river, which I hadn’t had a chance to fish yet. The excitement grew the day before when Tom gave me the report of the first day fishing. Tom hooked 10 and landed 5 and all nice big fish. Because of low water and no rain the early steelhead season had been slim pickings. November and December were tough and most days on the water you were working for a couple of fish. We had a really big storm the week before that brought some much needed water to the system and allowed many of those lower river fish to make their way upstream. This was one of the better Trinity river reports I had heard all season. The best part of it all is they didn’t see another boat all day.

Indian Creek LodgeI was to meet those guys over at Indian Creek Lodge at 8 am. Due to snow and rain that morning I got an early start and pulled into the parking lot with plenty of time to spare. Tom and I got caught up and talked about some of his upcoming fly fishing trips and Ernie pulled in just before 8, ready to go.

The plan was made that we were going to float the upper river.  So, we all ran up to the top, dropped the boat in water and Tom and Ernie ran the shuttle as I kept an eye on the boat and rigged up my rod for the day.

Anybody who does anything for a long time, especially fly fishing, gets particular about the way they like to do things and that is no different for me. Given my choice, I love to feel the tug of a steelhead and would swing a fly any day if given the choice. But, I also love going with anybody who is really good at doing what they do and has a passion for doing it. I have had some great times with friends who throw jerkbaits in the shallows at night for big walleye. Others who have their boats decked out for Kokanee fishing and know the ins and outs, depths and rigs to catch them. I just like to get out and see all types of fishing, so I was ready to catch some fish no matter what type of fishing was planned for the day.

Tackle bagsWatching Ernie get set up in the morning was surprisingly comical. Ernie doesn’t believe in wasting time and money on “unnecessary gear”.  All his terminal gear could be found in 3 plastic grocery sacks. With it raining, this system didn’t seem to be ideal.  A couple of the bags were already filled with water and there were loose leaders, tippet, flies, hooks, egg patterns, beads, barrel swivels, weight, lots of little zip lock bags, and of course a couple even contained some garbage. As you can imagine, there is no organizing anything in plastic bags. He picked up one old bag at the end of it’s life and all the gear dropped out of the bottom onto the side of his boat. Ernie gave a grin and responded with, “time for a new tackle bag”. He took his time as we were in no rush, which is very typical of a day with Ernie. He was methodical, lumbering and worked at his own pace, but unbeknownst to us, he had a plan for the day and was in execution mode, the Ernie-way.

We finally got on the river around 10ish. But once on the water, Ernie was at home and everything seemed very fluid and crisp. He maneuvered his boat down the low, narrow, rocky river precisely and everything he did was very calculated, with minimal effort and NO wasted motion. With 30+ years of experience on the oars, Ernie knows how to move his boat with little to no wasted movement.  He was always putting the boat in a precise location and a lot of the spots we hit with only one cast and pulled up and adjusted our rigs for the next run.

Ernie putting it in the netThe rig setup that we were using that day had been masterfully thought out by Ernie.  His nymphing set up was very simple yet, easily adjustable and everything was predetermined and had a purpose. We had three different locations for the indicator which were moved by adjusting a toothpick and it varied the depth by a few feet. Weight was constantly on and off depending on each run. We rarely got snagged and were always just tapping bottom, which is exactly the drift you are looking for on the Trinity. It was a common thing to hear him say “strip them in, move your indicators to the deepest level, put on a weight and grab a seat”. As we came up on the run, he would let us know ahead of time which side we were fishing, exactly where to put the cast and of course constant mending reminders. There was very little guess work for us, we followed his commands. Most of the time we did one run through and on some of his better spots we would hit it again and take a different line.

In the morning, Tom warned me about Ernie yelling to set, but I don’t think I was quite ready for it. The second run as I was looking off at something and probably day dreaming when this bellowing “SET” echoed off the walls and made me jump. Luckily I wasn’t the one he was directing the order at and Tom sheepishly looked away as he missed the potential fish.

Trinity steelheadErnie loves to guide his clients into fish and have a successful numbers day.  He is there to catch you fish. When it comes to steelhead fishing on the Trinity, Ernie enjoys clients that are experienced steelhead anglers.

Like most experienced guides, Ernie isn’t too keen on tangles.  But what guide or angler really enjoys those anyways.  That is just time not spent fishing and they usually happen at the absolute worst possible time.

Ernie’s river knowledge library is hard to fathom. This is his 32nd year with The Fly Shop® and he usually works between 240 – 280 days a year. On his days off you’ll find him chasing whatever he heard is catchable in the area. That is a lot of hours on the river. He spends the majority of his days on the Lower Sacramento and almost just as many on the Trinity, with some McCloud, Pit River, Hat Creek and coastal trips mixed in. Just thinking about the amount of time on the oars staring at indicators and dry flies and the amount of fish he has netted and sees from year to year is just mind boggling

After a few Foster’s that night he told us he estimated that he has landed around 30,000 steelhead in his 32 years guiding and personal time fishing. When you spend any extended periods of time on a river there is a certain connection to the water and I know it is cliche, but you kind of become one with the rivers you fish. Ernie has definitely achieved that oneness with the rivers he fishes, knowing exactly where the fish will be.  Although when you are in it, you don’t  see it this way, you are just doing your thing. I know I felt it a little bit in Alaska when I spent 6 years on a particular river fishing it everyday for three-four months at a time. You start to “flow” with the river and your decisions are based less on logical thinking and more on feeling.

At the end of the day, we were both slowing down a little and it was cooling off both fishing and temperature wise. Tom and I were looking at each other and thinking we should just reel up and head for the takeout.  However, that isn’t the Ernie way.  His enthusiasm didn’t wane. He fished us to the very end and all the way through the last run, we were adjusting our rigs and fishing them.

 

Shane Kohlbeck

800 • 669 • 3474

Shane Kohlbeck

Published: February 12, 2021

Shane KohlbeckOf the attributes the most successful fishing guides possess, an in-depth, intimate knowledge of the waters they fish tops the list. Shane Kohlbeck is one of those guides whose knowledge of the Lower Sacramento River rivals anyone. Pick any day in the year and he will tell you which insects will be on the menu, the fly to use, how to fish it, and the specific locations that will hold willing trout. This depth of expertise only comes from 23 years spent guiding rivers you love.

Shane began fishing as a young boy and has been spinning flies since he was just 11. While he has been guiding in Northern California since 1995, and for The Fly Shop® since 1997, his experience has not been limited to his home waters. Early on he spent three seasons guiding at Rapids Camp Lodge for Alaska rainbows, at Hoodoo Sportfishing in the Aleutians swinging for king salmon, and later mousing on the Kamchatka peninsula in Russia’s far east, making the first descent down the Ozernaya River. He and his wife Sarah also managed the Big Ku Lodge in Katmai, Alaska. It was after hosting trips to Paradise Lodge (now ESB Lodge) on the Gulf of Mexico on Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula that he became enthralled with the salt.

Shane Kohlbech Casting InstructionGaining his Casting Instructor certification with Fly Fishers International in 1999, Shane taught alongside Mel Krieger at The Fly Shop’s Fly Fishing Schools and Kids FishCamp™. Combining his love of flats fishing and his passion for introducing fly anglers to new aspects of the sport, Shane has taught saltwater fly fishing schools in the Bahamas and Mexico and was instrumental in helping start up Sightcast Los Roques with the late Chris Yrazabal in Venezuela.

Shane Kohlbeck at Bollibokka ClubShane excels guiding the Lower Sacramento River, but he also is an expert guide on the Upper Sacramento River, and the McCloud River on the Bollibokka Club. His copious experience fishing and guiding fresh and saltwaters, along with his extensive instructional abilities, make a day spent with Shane not only productive, but a great learning experience.

Q&A with Shane Kohlbeck:

How long have you lived in Redding?
Lived in Redding since ’77

Are you married?
Yes, I have a wonderful wife and a six year old daughter.

How did you get started in fly fishing?
Started tying flies at age 11, fishing all through my youth, going exclusive fly-fishing only in ’94.

When did you get started as a fishing guide?
I got my first California guide license in ’95.

Shane with Christmas Island bonefishWhen did you get started with The Fly Shop®?
Started working with TFS Sept ’97. Still guiding the Lower Sacramento River – 23 years later. Also currently guide the Upper Sacramento and Bollibokka on the McCloud River.

Are you a certified casting instructor?
Yes, I became a Certified FFI Casting Instructor in ’99.  Taught alongside Mel Krieger for three years at the TFS FishCamp™ and adult schools.

Shane with a Christmas Island Giant TrevallyDid you ever work in the shop?
’99-’04  — assisted in Management of Outfitters Department at The Fly Shop®, managing Private Waters and Guide Service.

What was your first hosted trip?
My first international hosted trip with The Fly Shop® was to Paradise Lodge (now ESB Lodge) in ’99. Then I was hooked on salt … with now over 300 days logged fishing saltwater flats.

Have you been to Russia (Kamchatka)?
Kamchatka, Russia — a hosted a trip in ’02 – was the first descent of Ozernaya River.

Shane at Los RoquesHave you guided in the saltwater?
Three trips to Los Roques, Venezuela before living there for five months in ’05 … training guides, lodge host, fly development, casting instructor.

What other interesting places have you worked or managed?
One season in the Cook Islands (’09) on Tongareva/Penrhyn Island, researching bonefish movement and training local guides.

Shane at Hoodoo with Mike MercerHow about Alaska — have you guided and fished there?
In ’05, started guiding AlaskaRapids Camp Lodge ’05, ’06, ’07. Guided for King Salmon at Hoodoo Sportfishing on the Aleutian Peninsula in ’09.  Then managed (along with my wife) the Big Ku Lodge in Katmai Park, Alaska in 2011.

What hosted trips have you done with The Fly Shop?
TFS hosted trips have been to Los Roques (four trips) plus one fly fishing school, the Mexican Yucatan (two trips) plus one fly fishing school at ESB, Russia, Christmas Island (six times).

Where else have you fished?
Other fly fishing travel has included British Columbia, Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Wyoming, Florida, Hawaii, Bahamas (six times) Belize (twice), Baja.

Booking Shane for a day of guided fishing

To book Shane or one of our other excellent guides, please give us a call at 800-669-3474 during business hours any day of the week, or email us at bryan@theflyshop.com or chris@theflyshop.com anytime. We can give you the answers you need, detailed explanations to questions you might have, or check on availability and confirm your reservation in minutes.

Ian Stratte

800 • 669 • 3474

Ian Stratte

Published: January 12, 2021

We would like to welcome Ian Stratte to the guide team here at The Fly Shop®.

Ian Stratte
Ian Stratte helping with river cleanup on the Lower Sacramento River

A California native originally from Eureka, Calif., Ian began fly fishing at an early age after finding his grandfather’s fly rods in the garage and taking them for a spin. His family transplanted to Redding, Calif., and he has pursued many different species of fish in the North State’s most known waters. Ian is equally at home guiding from a drift boat for trout and steelhead, wade fishing with clients on steelhead rivers with a two-handed rod or Euro nymphing on the McCloud River for trout. Most of all, Ian enjoys sharing his passion and joy of fly fishing with new and seasoned anglers alike, and you can count on him to put in a full day on the water and help you more than likely leave a better angler.

Q&A with Ian Stratte:

How did you get started in fly fishing?
I started fly fishing as a kid when I found some old Hardy Brothers fly rods in my dad’s fishing gear that were his father’s. I asked my dad if I could try to use them, and after that I was hooked.

How did you get started as a fishing guide?
After the loss of my father, I stopped fishing and kinda went to a dark place. Another fishing guide got me out on the water again, and I realized what I was missing and that what I wanted to do no matter what it took was to be a fly fishing guide.

If you had one piece of advice to give to your guide clients, what would it be?
Enjoy the journey — the rewards will come when you least expect them.

Favorite fish to pursue?
Steelhead

What fly fishing destination is on your bucket list?
I think going for trophy sea run trout on the swing would be so much fun, and one couldn’t ask for a more memorable situation than doing it in a place as beautiful as La Villa de Maria Behety with the expansive ranch and five star lodging. The Patagonia area of Argentina would be amazing, and the landscape and vast country make it beautiful in its own magical ways. The brown trout there have a different fight about them, and getting a sea run possibly pushing 20+ pounds seems like something only dreams are made of. Many anglers have much more amazing and extravagant species on their bucket list, but to me there is nothing more amazing than fishing for anadromous fish that run from salt to fresh water. I believe the fishing trip of a lifetime for any anadromous angler must include Argentina’s sea run brown on the swing, and add in the luxurious accommodations of a five-star luxury stay, and even the non-anglers would not want to leave.

Ian StratteFavorite fly rod?
R.L. Winston – The Winston Air Salt is becoming a new favorite. I got to cast one recently and it has everything I want in a rod. The action is fast with lots of backbone to turn over big salt rigs or stripper rigs. It feels like the rod that can handle most big fish you would want to target whether it’s steelhead or redfish. I personally love two-handed rods and swinging flies. But, the Winston Trout Micro Spey rod is my favorite for many reasons. The rod has a super light feel, and with a soft but fast action, and it’s featherlight but with the power of a precision nail gun. You can put little sculpin patterns tight to the bank blasted up under willows or set a dry skater down with a delicate light touch. Winston has longevity in the game of rod building that can’t be matched. I believe their experience and standards for quality makes both their two-handed rods and single-handed rods the best in the business.

Favorite reel?
Ross Reels! I like that they were started in Etna, California, and they feel solid in your hand.

Favorite fly?
The Boss — it’s a classic that is still very effective.

What is your greatest fly fishing extravagance?
Fly fishing in Alaska as a child

Which living or non-living fly fisher would you want to spend a day fly fishing with?
Jimmy Green – Jimmy Green grew up in San Francisco in the golden era of fly fishing. At that time, the Bay Area happened to be the Mecca for West Coast fly fishing. You had the Golden Gate Angling & Casting Club, and many of the fly fishing companies of the day were based out of the area. As a child Green worked in the fly line industry, and he also went to many distance casting tournaments. He later became known throughout the fly fishing world for many reasons: He was the first person to cast a fly over 200 feet with a two-handed Winston rod; he created the shooting head; and he’s the reason fly lines made a giant progression to lighter and better materials. He focused weight to the tip of the line and shortened it while evenly distributing the weight over a small section of monofilament, and the rest is history. I would want to fish with Green because he was a great caster and engineer, and he understood the mechanics and the science of casting but also what he was casting. I would really want to pick his brain on how he could generate so much distance with little effort. I think he had the largest impact on how we target so many fish now with integrated sink lines and shooting heads.

Who are your favorite writers?
Walt Whitman, Theodore Roosevelt and Henry David Thoreau

What single issue in fly fishing do you feel has the greatest adverse potential?
Hatchery operation and effects of dam removal to anglers and fishing runs

What is the most memorable fly fishing trip you’ve taken?
A trip with my dad to Alaska — we went fly fishing and didn’t catch a thing, which is tough to do in Alaska but we only fly fished for the day. Dad lost a grayling.

Which talent or natural gift would you most like to have?
To learn new languages easily

Who are your heroes in real life?
My father for teaching me to follow my passion. My mother for showing me life will get a lot tougher, but so will you.

What is your fly fishing pet peeve?
Losing gear that is retrievable and leaving it in a tree on the bank.

What do you most value in your friends?
Honesty and fairness and being a little competitive

If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be?
I would come back as myself.

Andrew Hoodenpyle

800 • 669 • 3474

Andrew Hoodenpyle

Published: December 8, 2020

Andrew HoodenpyleWe would like to welcome back Andrew Hoodenpyle to the guide team at The Fly Shop®.

Andrew, or “Hoody” as we know him, was introduced to the sport early by his grandfather, an accomplished cane rod builder up on the Fall River. His passion for fly fishing took hold, and by the age of 12 he was spending as much time as possible exploring every nook and cranny in Northern California. He excels guiding on the Lower Sacramento and Trinity Rivers, but the lesser-traveled spots on the McCloud and Pit Rivers are his favorites.

Andrew Hoodenpyle

Andrew has guided at Hoodoo Sportfishing on the Sandy River in Alaska, putting his clients on Arctic char, king salmon and rainbows with single and two-handed rods, and for the past five years, he’s put anglers on just about every fishy spot here in the North State that holds trout or steelhead. He is an accomplished fly tier as well, so more often than not, when you are fishing with Hoody, you are fishing one of his hand-tied creations. An avid fly fisher, he continues to invest much of his free time scouting new locations and techniques with his trusty pal “Sue”, his golden retriever.

Andrew Hoodenpyle with his sweet dog Sue

Whether it is taking clients into a great dry fly spot on the Upper Sacramento or raising a steelhead to a skated dry on the Trinity with a first-time Spey caster, Andrew’s intimate knowledge, genuine enthusiasm and good nature ensure his clients will have a great day on the water.

Booking Hoody for a day of guided fishing

To book Hoody or one of our other excellent guides, please give us a call at 800-669-3474 during business hours any day of the week, or email us at bryan@theflyshop.com or chris@theflyshop.com anytime. We can give you the answers you need, detailed explanations to questions you might have, or check on availability and confirm your reservation in minutes.