The Everglades are like no other fishery in the United States.

Deep in the interior, laid up tarpon float  in slick lagoons at first light, and all you can see are the tips of their dorsal and tail fins braking through the water’s surface. The fins are several feet apart, slanting towards the rear, and quickly doing the math you realize that the fish your approaching is close to six feet long. The copper glow of sunlight peeking through the top of the mangroves, and the first bird calls of the day make you think of Joseph Conrad’s “Heart of Darkness”, your fly landing a couple feet in front of the fish. With a couple slow pulls on the line, the fish slowly glides forward with a gentle kick of her tail, silently inhaling the fly. The first run takes you well into the backing and the fish explodes through the mirrored surface and high into the air. Her pale silver body contrasts against the dense shadowed shoreline, and for a brief moment the world stops, etching an image into your soul that you will never forget.

This is the Everglades, and this is why you are here…

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2021 Reservations & Rates

4 nights lodging and 4 days guided fishing $19,200 for an inclusive group of four anglers ($4,800 per angler)

5 nights lodging and 5 days guided fishing $24,000 for an inclusive group of four anglers ($6,000 per angler)

Limited to four anglers maximum at one time

Guided fly fishing, all food and drink, fishing equipment and flies, fishing licenses, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages.

Round trip airfare to Miami or Ft. Lauderdale, ground transfers to Flamingo, gratuities to crew and guides, specific alcoholic beverages of your choice.

The Fly Shop® is not in the insurance business, but we recommend Travel Guard (AIG) and Global Rescue (IMG) coverage as a service with a desire to see your best interests protected. It is impossible to know when an unfortunate situation (loss of luggage, fly rods, illness in the family, or an accident) may occur. However, such things can and do happen, and this insurance can provide a means of recourse against non-refundable financial losses.

Travel Insurance Information

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Seasons at Outpost Mothership Everglades

Though the fishing can be excellent during other months, March and April are consistent fishing magic in the Everglades. It’s a time when migrating tarpon make their way north and mix with the resident population, often moving into the warmer back country bays.

Some days you’ll look around at free jumping and rolling fish, and think there are more tarpon in one single bay than anywhere in the world. With the water temperatures warming, snook and redfish start to move into extremely shallow water this time of year, offering fly rod anglers plenty of sight-fishing opportunities.

Most locations in the United States experience four seasons, summer, fall, winter, and spring. The Everglades have two, a wet season and a dry season. The dry season runs from December through April. During this period, the “glades” experience a decrease in water levels, and air temperatures are pleasant with low humidity and clear skies, and barely two inches of rain each month. Temperatures reach average highs between seventy and eighty degrees, and a low near sixty. The summer wet season, June through September, averages eight inches of rain each month, with daytime high temperatures near ninety degrees, and lows around seventy.

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Getting to Outpost Mothership Everglades

Day 1
It’s an hour and forty minute drive from the Miami international airport to the Flamingo Marina, Everglades National Park, Florida.

Arriving at one pm at the Flamingo marina, you’ll be met by both the guides and the mothership captain. The captain and staff will collect your luggage and transfer it to the staterooms aboard the mothership. The guides will have food and beverages in a cooler aboard their skiffs, ready

to go. You should arrive at the marina in your fishing clothes, as you’ll depart the marina with the guides for an afternoon of fishing, meeting at the mothership in the evening to share cocktails and appetizers, and a gourmet dinner with friends, topping off your first day.

Days 2 - 4
The chef will prepare breakfast each morning, with a flexible fishing start time. You’ll board the skiffs to chase tarpon, snook and other species on the flats, river mouths and backcountry. Your guide will have the skiff’s cooler stocked with fresh lunches, water and drinks. You’ll have the option of either a chef’s special lunch back at the ship, or eat on the water aboard the skiff. At the end of the day, anglers return to the mothership for adult beverages and hors d'oeuvres, and enjoy the camaraderie of fellow anglers while indulging in another gourmet dinner.

Day 5
Your day of departure begins with a chef’s breakfast and a morning of guided fishing, followed up with a water transfer back to the Flamingo marina around noon.

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Lodging at Outpost Mothership Everglades

Mothership details

• 61′ Hatteras
• Capacity is four guests, with no mixing of groups
• Four guest staterooms including four single staterooms with two shared bathrooms
• Fully equipped Glide and Hell’s Bay skiffs
• Spacious living room/bar and kitchen with satellite TV

• Air-conditioning throughout the vessel
• Guided fishing with two anglers per guide

Dining and Accommodations Complete with a spacious bar, living area, and four well-appointed staterooms, the Outpost mothership is the ultimate liveaboard vessel. The ship’s private chef keeps the anglers and crew well fed with fresh coffee and eggs to order in the morning and fresh seafood feasts at night.

Menus are customized for each group of anglers before their trip. Iced coolers stocked with sandwiches, fruit, homemade cookies, and ice-cold drinks are aboard the skiffs every day.

The Outpost mothership The 61’ Hatteras Outpost mothership takes the live-aboard lifestyle to a new level. While being out on the flats always takes top billing, you’ll relax, eat, drink, and sleep in unmatched comfort aboard the mothership. And the key here is the outstanding crew—professional captain, gourmet chef, plus superior guides. Your private chef prepares creative fresh island cuisine each day on board, and packs your coolers with savory lunches, snacks, and ice cold drinks to keep your energy up when out on the skiffs. Or, you can choose to return to the ship for lunch and a midday break. At the end of the day, you’ll share your fishing tales while sipping your favorite beverage and watching the sunset. For dinner you’ll enjoy artistic presentations of just-caught seafood and fresh produce topped off by a sumptuous dessert, and sleep peacefully in the well-appointed staterooms.

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Fishing at Outpost Mothership Everglades

Eleven’s all-inclusive live-aboard expedition in Everglades National Park is one of the most unique domestic saltwater fly fishing programs in the Continental United States. Outpost mothership trips are designed for anglers who want to maximize their time on the water in one of the world’s most coveted national parks. Strategically positioned in the Everglades wilderness, your access from the mothership to prime tarpon and snook fishing is virtually unlimited due its massive size, in excess of 2,300 square miles of sand beaches, backcountry creeks, and

river mouths lined with ancient mangroves. It would take a lifetime to see and fish all of the waters of Everglades National Park. If you’re looking to fish tarpon on the fly, hunt fish deep in the backcountry, and share a rich fishing experience with a close group of good friends, the Everglades Outpost Mothership is the right choice for you.

Everglades National Park – Florida’s “River of Grass”
Spanning the southern tip of the Florida peninsula and most of Florida Bay, Everglades National Park is the only subtropical preserve in North America. It contains both temperate and tropical plant communities, including sawgrass prairies, mangrove and cypress swamps, pinelands, hardwood hammocks, marine and estuarine environments, and the largest mangrove ecosystem in the Western hemisphere. Among the Everglades' abundant wildlife are the endangered leatherback turtle, Florida panther and West Indian manatee. The park is known for its rich bird life, particularly large wading birds, such as the roseate spoonbill, wood stork, great blue heron and a variety of egrets. And, the “glades” feature one of the largest populations of resident tarpon and snook in the country.

The Everglades are like no other fishery in the United States. Deep in the interior, laid up tarpon float in slick lagoons at first light, and all you can see are the tips of their dorsal and tail fins braking through the water’s surface. The fins are several feet apart, slanting towards the rear, and quickly doing the math you realize that the fish your approaching is close to six feet long. The copper glow of sunlight peeking through the top of the mangroves, and the first bird calls of the day make you think of Joseph Conrad’s “Heart of Darkness”, your fly landing a couple feet in front of the fish. With a couple slow pulls on the line, the fish slowly glides forward with a gentle kick of her tail, silently inhaling the fly. The first run takes you well into the backing and the fish explodes through the mirrored surface and high into the air. Her pale silver body contrasts against the dense shadowed shoreline, and for a brief moment the world stops, etching an image into your soul that you will never forget. This is the Everglades, and this is why you are here.

The park was authorized in 1934, but, because of difficulties acquiring land, it was not established until 1947. UNESCO designated it a Biosphere Reserve in 1976 and a World Heritage site in 1979. The park’s area has been expanded several times, most recently in 1989. It encompasses 2,357 square miles, including most of Florida Bay, and preserves a unique blend of temperate and tropical species and freshwater and marine habitats.

The “sheet flow” of water across the land makes this area unique in contrast to other wetlands that typically rely on waters originating from rivers and streams. During the summer rainy season, water overflows from Lake Okeechobee along its southern shoreline, moving southward across sawgrass marshes and vast wetlands. This sheet flow of water is due to the gradual slope of the land of less than two inches per mile. Marsh vegetation further reduces the flow from near zero to two feet per minute. This flow continues for approximately one hundred miles, finally reaching the waters of Florida Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Within these miles are tiny creeks and secret lagoons where baby tarpon live with largemouth bass and dark bodied snook, feeding on baitfish, dragon flies, and anything else they can catch and inhale.

Foam bodied gurglers and cupped face poppers draw these backcountry dwellers out from the mangrove lined shorelines, attacking flies with ruthless abandon. After a morning in the backcountry with the sun climbing into the sky, your guide swiftly maneuvers his skiff through a seemingly endless maze of twisting channels, and you emerge on the coast and the waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Now it’s time to pole the outer keys for ocean side tarpon. A snook glides under the bow, and the same fish that was burnished in a golden hue deep in the dark waters of the backcountry has now turned silver and bright to camouflage amongst the light colored sand and clear water of the gulf. Your guide calls out, “eleven o’clock, sixty feet, going left, and you see a string of six tarpon sliding up on the flat. Its game time and you’re up.

The Fishing
The Everglades feature one of the largest populations of resident tarpon anywhere in the country. Tarpon in the “glades” range in size from ten to more than a hundred pounds. You can hunt them miles into the backcountry where the water is more “sweet” (freshwater) than salt, laid up along twisted mangrove roots, and all the way out to the clear water sand flats surrounding the outer keys. They inhale poppers chugged on the surface in the backcountry, purple and black streamers in the river mouths, pale baitfish patterns on the outer flats, and no matter where they are or what their size, you are guaranteed that they will get airborne after the hookup.

The beauty of the Everglades, unlike many tarpon fisheries around the world, is that you can target these fish when the wind is blowing hard out on the coastal flats. Of course, we all prefer calm weather fly fishing. Unlike open water tarpon fisheries, like the ocean side flats of the lower keys, the Outpost guides know where to find quality tarpon fishing with wind protection from tall mangrove trees. It’s no wonder that this is one of the best locations for an angler to hunt big tarpon on the fly, and it’s better with your private mothership as home base.

Snook are Everglades residents, living throughout the backcountry and out to the coast. Snook average a respectable eight to ten pounds, and fish that tip the scales in excess of twenty pounds are hooked every season. Hooking a snook is just the beginning of the battle. These powerful backcountry brawlers typically charge immediately for cover when hooked, often swimming deep into the maze of barnacle encrusted mangrove roots. This is a huge difference from the tarpon fishing, where the first moments after the hookup are importantly spent clearing the line off the deck and getting the fish connected to the reel. If you give a snook that time, you may watch your fly line disappear through the mangrove roots and into shredded darkness. Snook fishing is hand to hand combat, from the moment that you set the hook, and you never give that fish any line that you don’t have to.

In addition to the renowned tarpon and snook fishing, the Everglades and its surrounding coastal waters support healthy populations of redfish, tripletail, cobia, sharks, jacks, and more. It’s a multi-species destination, offering a wide variety of fishing opportunities. One minute you are locked in on a tarpon laid up on the periphery of a mangrove island, and the next thing you know a school of marauding jacks are charging up the channel, looking to hammer anything in their path. You can fish snook on top water flies, jacks on big flashy streamers, tripletail on shrimp patterns, and cobia eating crabs behind rays. It can be a manic and often frantic fishery, where everyone, guides and anglers work together, heads on a swivel, looking for the next angling opportunity - target.

What Makes This Destination Special and Unique?

• Unlike many tarpon fisheries where you can get blown off the flats, in the Everglades you can target these fish when the wind is howling due to the protective environment of the fishery. That translates into no missed fishing days, optimal fishing conditions and of course hook-ups.

• The advantage of a mothership program is mobility. Outpost Mothership is a mobile fishing lodge and has easy and quick access to miles of mangrove lined backcountry, and ocean side keys. Run times to the and from the daily fishing venues are kept short and that means more time fishing, and less time boat riding.

• The Outpost mothership offers remote angling opportunities in the Everglades, a vast uninhabited wilderness that sees little angling pressure. Anglers that like the idea of fishing true wilderness for tarpon and snook that are big and wild owe it to themselves to fish the “Glades”.

• All anglers are accommodated in single occupancy rooms. No need to share a room with another guest, and no need to bring ear plugs to insure a good night’s sleep. You’ll get a good night’s rest and be fresh each morning, ready for a full day’s fishing.

• Fishing with the Eleven’s Outpost Mothership in the Everglades is an international world-class saltwater fly fishery without ever having to leave the Country. Easy travel, no language barriers, no passport required – this is a great trip for anglers that don’t want to travel internationally.

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Making Reservations to Outpost Mothership Everglades

To make a reservation, please give us a call at 800-669-3474 during business hours (Monday - Friday • 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM), or email us at travel@theflyshop.com anytime. We can give you the answers you need, detailed explanations to questions you might have, or check on availability and confirm your reservation in minutes.